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How black holes can spaghettify stars that fall too close – Mashable

Spaghetti never sounded so deadly.

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Spaghettification sounds like a particularly unpleasant thing to happen to pretty much anything that isn’t a lump of pasta dough. Now imagine it happening to a star.
Thats precisely what astronomers around the world observed over a six-month period when a black hole stretched and ripped apart a star that was sucked into its intense gravitational grasp at a distance of 215 million light years from Earth, as detailed in an Oct. 12 study
published through the Royal Astronomical Society. It was t…

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Water exists on the moon, scientists confirm – The Guardian

Proof of significant amounts of H2O has implications for future lunar missions

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Scientists have gathered some of the most compelling evidence yet for the existence of water on the moon and it may be relatively accessible. The discovery has implications for future missions to the moon and deeper space exploration.
With no significant atmosphere insulating it from the suns rays, it had been assumed that the moons surface was dry until the 1990s, when orbiting spacecraft found indications of ice in large and inaccessible craters near the moons poles.
Then in 2009, imaging spectrometers…

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Super-resolution microscopy and machine learning shed new light on fossil pollen grains – Phys.org

Plant biology researchers at the University of Illinois and computer scientists at the University of California Irvine have developed a new method of fossil pollen…

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Plant biology researchers at the University of Illinois and computer scientists at the University of California Irvine have developed a new method of fossil pollen identification through the combination of super-resolution microscopy and machine learning. The team, led by Dr. Surangi Punyasena and Ms. Ingrid Romero (associate professor and graduate student in Plant Biology, respectively), developed and trained three convolutional neural network models to identify fossil pollen specimens from an…

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Pandemic calm helps people eavesdrop on rare dolphins – AlKhaleej Today

Pandemic calm helps people eavesdrop on rare dolphins

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This story originally appeared on Atlas Obscura and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration.The calm waters of the Gippsland Lakes near Melbourne, Australia are broken by a fin, and the calm afternoon is pierced by a tall pipe. A Burrunan dolphin broke the surface before diving and emitting the sound that would normally only be received by other aquatic animals. This time, however, the dolphins signal is being picked up by a team of scientists for whom the coronavirus pandemic had a silverback…

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